Music Friday: Sleeping With Sirens’ Kellin Quinn Has a 24-Karat Vision of Success in the Brand New Release, ‘Gold’

Welcome to Music Friday when we bring you awesome songs with jewelry, gemstones or precious metals in the title or lyrics. Today, Sleeping With Sirens' frontman Kellin Quinn has a 24-karat vision of success in the group’s brand new single, “Gold.”

Released on Wednesday with an exclusive premiere on Billboard.com, “Gold” alludes to the band's six-year-long, often-bumpy ride to the top of the charts, and how they overcame adversity and never took their eyes off the prize.

Quinn explained his inspirations for writing the song.

“It kind of goes back to those early days of us touring in a van and the experience of touring, getting where you needed to go, not being afraid," Quinn told Billboard.com. "When you're coming up as a band you have this excitement. The only place to go is forward. So that was kind of the idea for me, thinking about the climb and the getting there, some of the most exciting parts of the journey of being in a band and being an artist, creating songs in your garage. That's where the song started for me."

Showcasing his unique tenor leggiero vocal range, Quinn sings, “We made our mistakes / It's not too late / We had to learn the hard way / Bridges will burn / Now it's our turn / We had to learn the hard way / Because all we ever want is gold.”

“Gold” is the third track from the band’s album, Madness, which is set to release on March 17. Billboard.com is predicting that Madness will debut in the top 5 on the Billboard 200 album chart. The band’s previous album made its debut at #3 on the album chart.

Sleeping With Sirens, which boasts three million Facebook followers, is currently on the European leg of a five-month world tour, which started in Fresno, Calif., in November and will end in London next month.

We invite you to listen to Quinn and his band singing “Gold.” The video and lyrics are below…

"Gold"
Written by Kellin Quinn. Performed by Sleeping With Sirens.

All we want, what we want is
All we want is gold
Sun sets on my nylon
Pull the windows down in the van
Lost my map on the Jersey turnpike
But it's okay we ain't looking back

All we ever want is gold
One way on this winding road

We made our mistakes
It's not too late
We had to learn the hard way
Bridges will burn
Now it's our turn
We had to learn the hard way
Because all we ever want is gold
We made our mistakes
It's not too late
We had to learn the hard way

It's two in the morning
Can't seem to find the words for a song
I remember my dreams and how fun they seem
I can't believe how far we have come
Cause all we ever want is gold
So is sixty miles on this open road

We made our mistakes
It's not too late
We had to learn the hard way
Bridges will burn
Now it's our turn
We had to learn the hard way
Because all we ever want is gold
We made our mistakes
It's not too late
We had to learn the hard way

Don't lose your faith in me (Don't ever look like, don't ever look like)
It's never what it seems

You make your mistakes
But it's never too late
We had to learn the hard way
You made your mistakes
It's not too late
You had to learn the hard way
Bridges will burn
Now it's your turn
You had to learn the hard way
Cause all we ever want is gold
All we ever want is gold (We had to learn the hard way)
All we want, what we want is
All we want is gold
All we want, what we want is
All we want is gold

Lada Gaga Reveals Secret Detail of Her Heart-Shaped Diamond Engagement Ring

Newly betrothed Lady Gaga revealed a secret design detail of her new heart-shaped diamond engagement ring — a sweet and sentimental element she calls “my favorite part" of the ring. That's saying a lot because the 8-carat center stone is magnificent.

When Gaga surprised her 5.7 million Instagram followers with the announcement of her Valentine’s Day engagement to actor Taylor Kinney, the photo accompanying the post was a view from the top, offering a detailed image of the heart-shaped diamond. The image also offered a glimpse of a thin diamond pavé band.

A couple days later, she posted a second photo, this time showing the beautifully crafted underside of the ring and a surprising detail.

Instead of adding an inscription, fiancé Kinney and celebrity jeweler Lorraine Schwartz collaborated on a neat enhancement to the band — “T [heart] S” spelled out in pavé diamonds. “S” is for Stefani, Gaga’s birth name.

Here’s how Gaga captioned her Instagram photo: “My favorite part of my engagement ring, Taylor and Lorraine designed “T [heart] S” in white diamonds on the band. He always called me by my birth name. Since our very first date. I'm such a happy bride-to-be! I can't stop smiling!!”

We think there’s good reason to believe that many future brides and grooms will be asking jewelers to add a similar detail to their engagement rings. More than 384,000 of Gaga's followers on Instagram liked the “T [heart] S” photo.

Although she would not divulge the actual cost of the ring, Schwartz told Brides.com that the center stone is actually more expensive than some of the estimates she had read. That would put the price in excess of a half million dollars.

Jewelry expert Shari Fabrikant of Robert Fabrikant Inc. had told HollywoodLife.com that the heart-shaped center stone appeared to be about 8 carats in size. “The setting is simple with a few round diamonds down the side,” she noted. “If the stone is an E color and VS1, it would run close to $500,000.”

Zaven Ghanimian, CEO of Simon G. Jewelry, had told E! News that he was confident the stone weighs in at about 6 carats. "I would estimate at least SI1 clarity or better, G color or better," he said. "For a stone of this size and quality, the price could be up to $400,000."

Images: Instagram/LadyGaga

3 Simple Tips for Taking Care of Your New Mechanical Watch

Purchasing a luxury watch can be an exciting time — whether it’s your first watch or your fifth watch. Once home, however, you will need to properly take care of your watch to give it a longer and healthier lifespan. While all watches need regular professional servicing, following these few tips can help you get the most from your new investment.

1. Clean It. Everything you do while wearing your watch causes it to come into contact with dirt, dust, perspiration and even a few splashes of water while washing your hands or doing the dishes. The best thing you can do for your watch is a simple cleaning. When you take it off at the end of each day, wipe it down using a soft cloth to remove grime. If your watch has a metal bracelet, you can use a soft cloth and warm water to clean it, but be careful not to get too much water near the case. Even if you have a water-resistant watch, it's best to clean it after swimming, as chlorine and salt can be abrasive. Also note that leather straps may require special care and cleaning.

2. Know the Basics of Winding. If you own a mechanical watch it is important to follow the brand’s instructions about when and when not to wind it, and in which direction. Some complex watches cannot be wound at certain hours, when the mechanics inside are making their own calculations and adjustments. It is also important to remember when setting the watch to move the hands in a clockwise direction instead of counter clockwise.

3. Have it Serviced. As mentioned above, mechanical watches require regular servicing — just like a car. The gears and wheels must be oiled, and that oil can dry out over time. The watch needs to be carefully opened, examined, re-oiled, cleaned, have new gaskets put in to replace old gaskets and be retested for water resistance. Most brands suggest this be done every five to seven years.

Cars, Watches and the Daytona 500

This past weekend, the Daytona 500 took place in Daytona Beach, FL, though certain favorites didn’t make it to the final run, including Kyle Busch, who broke a leg and foot in a hard crash during the Xfinity Series race on Saturday at Daytona International Speedway. Nonetheless, the race was exciting – with Joey Logano speeding to victory in the 57th Great American Race. Logano is the youngest winner in the history of the Daytona 500 at just 24 years old.

All of the excitement with this race, and others coming into the season, reminds us of the precision mechanics it requires to build these performance engines and the patience and fortitude of the drivers. It is a field not unlike the world of precision mechanics under the hood of a watchcase.

In fact, as more watch brands recognize the synergy between precision mechanics of timepieces and automobiles, they are getting more involved in the world of motorsports. From actually taking title roles as Official Timer of certain races to sponsoring teams, drivers and rallies around the world, watch brands are on top of the fast-paced world of automobiles.

Rolex, for instance, has been intimately involved in auto racing since 1935, and solidified its position in the sport in 1959 when it began its association with the Daytona International Speedway. The brand continues to sponsor the Rolex Daytona races, as well as the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion every year in August, among other automotive activities. The brand’s iconic Daytona watch is the one most associated with automotive sports.

Similarly, Tudor is the Entitlement Sponsor of Tudor United Sportscar Championship races. This series combines two previously separate races — the American Le Mans Series and Grand Am Road Racing — under one umbrella managed by the International Motor Sports Association (IMSA). The TUDOR Grantour Chrono Fly-Back watch has a strong tie with the world of auto racing, as it allows consecutive time intervals to be measured rapidly via the on-the-fly chronograph reset and instant restart function.

TAG Heuer has long been involved in the world of auto racing – dating back to the Pan-American races. The brand is actively involved in the fully electric FIA Formula E Championship, World Rally (with Sebastien Ogier joining as a brand ambassador), is the Official Watch Partner of Nissan NISMO, and sponsors the TAG Heuer Premier Motor Racing Exhibition, which kicked off in Kuala Lumpur in January. The brand creates both the Monaco and Carrera watch lines that honor this sport and that have become renowned around the world for their race-inspired design and top-quality craftsmanship.

We are proud to carry these brands and others with auto-inspired themes. Stop in any time to see them.

100-Carat ‘Ultimate Emerald-Cut Diamond’ Could Fetch $25M at Sotheby’s New York in April

The 100.20-carat “Ultimate Emerald-Cut Diamond” could fetch as much as $25 million when it headlines Sotheby’s Magnificent Jewels auction in New York on April 21.

The “Ultimate” — a remarkable D-color, internally flawless stone — joins an elite club of only five comparable-quality 100-plus-carat diamonds to have ever hit the auction block. It’s the only one of the group to feature the classic emerald cut.

The current owner spent more than one year studying, cutting and polishing the original 200-carat rough diamond, which was mined by De Beers in South Africa. It is not unusual for a cutter to forgo 50 percent of the diamond's carat weight to yield a "perfect" stone.

“This 100.20 carat diamond is the definition of perfection,” commented Gary Schuler, Head of Sotheby’s Jewelry Department in New York. “The color is whiter than white. It is free of any internal imperfections, and so transparent that I can only compare it to a pool of icy water.”

Lisa Hubbard, Chairman of North & South America for Sotheby’s International Jewelry Division, called the 100-carat diamond the “rarest object of natural beauty on the market right now” and “the ultimate acquisition.”

“Simply put, it has everything you could ever want from a diamond,” she said. “The classic shape begs to be worn, while the quality puts it in an asset class of its own. The stone gives you so many options – admire it unmounted, wear it as a simple but stunning pendant, or mount it in a designed jewel.”

The per-carat selling price of upper-echelon stones has been on a steep ascent since Sotheby’s auctioned it first 100-carat "perfect" diamond in 1990. At that time, the price was $125,000 per carat. By 2013, the price had risen to $260,000 per carat. Sotheby’s low estimate of $19 million for “Ultimate Emerald-Cut Diamond” represents a valuation of $190,000 per carat.

April’s headliner will be promoted on a whirlwind month-long tour that will take the stone from Dubai in mid-March to New York in mid-April, with stops in Los Angeles, Hong Kong, London and Doha.

The five other 100-plus-carat “perfect” diamonds to be sold at auction are listed below:

• “The Mouawad Splendour” (101.84 carats) is a modified pear-shape diamond that was sold in 1990 at Sotheby’s Geneva for $12.7 million.

• “The Star of Happiness” (100.36 carats) is a rectangular modified brilliant-cut that sold at Sotheby’s Geneva for $11.9 million in 1993.

• “The Star of the Season” (100.10 carats) sports a pear shape and fetched $16.5 million at Sotheby’s Geneva in 1995.

• “The Winston Legacy” (101.73 carats) also has a pear shape and generated $26.7 million (a record $262,830 per carat) at Christie’s Geneva in 2013.

• “Spectacular Oval Diamond” (118.28 carats) is an oval brilliant-cut stone that scored a world auction record for a white diamond when it sold for $30.6 million at Sotheby’s Hong Kong in 2013.

(Photos courtesy of Sotheby’s.)